Quaintrelle (noun): a woman who emphasizes a life of passion expressed through personal style, leisurely pastimes, charm, and cultivation of life’s pleasures.
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A blog about all things life and design. WRITTEN BY A Self proclaimed spiritual hedonist and honorary unicorn.
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CHRYSALIS LINGERIE
Published on May 01, 2018
Chrysalis Launches Underwear Collection for Transgender Women (VIDEO)
Chrysalis is a lingerie brand created specifically for the Women of the Transgender Community. Chrysalis takes Transgender Women beyond the margenalization imposed by the media and society and represents them as beautiful intelligent women with prowess, and the embodiment of feminine sensuality.
Chrysalis came about to alleviate a primary stress and issue for Transgender Women. In the greater scope, Chrysalis was created to help change the dehumanizing stereotypes and biases we are subjected to as a group and community. Chrysalis symbolizes the acknowledgement an diversity of our existence and provides a solution to our specific needs. As a brand, Chrysalis takes Transgender Women beyond the margenalization imposed by the media and society and represents them as beautiful intelligent women with prowess, and the embodiment of feminine sensuality.

chrysalislingerie.com
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FASHION IS NOT SOMETHING THAT EXISTS IN DRESSES ONLY. FASHION IS IN THE SKY, IN THE STREET, FASHION HAS TO DO WITH IDEAS, THE WAY WE LIVE, WHAT IS HAPPENING.
–COCO CHANEL
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INTERVIEW WITH CY LAUZ BY TYLER MCCALL
Published on Apr 28, 2018
Meet Cy Lauz, the Designer Behind the First Lingerie Line for Transgendered Women
"When transgender woman Cy Lauz began to make her transition, she had a hard time finding undergarments that suited her needs–let alone that made her feel pretty, confident and feminine. Having formerly worked in fashion styling and interior design, she was accustomed to seeing beautifully made things that felt luxurious, and she wanted those kinds of products to be available for women like herself."
“There was nothing that made me feel good about being a trans woman and who I was as a professional and most importantly, who I was as a person,” Lauz says.

That’s when she started Chrysalis, the first lingerie brand designed by transgender women for transgender women. Though it’s just launching this spring with a line of basics, Chrysalis is already receiving buzz from the media and trans community alike. We caught up with Lauz to hear the struggles of designing a line of lingerie for transgender women, and what she hopes the new brand will accomplish (including starting a foundation devoted to helping transgender youth, among other things).

What challenges do transgendered women face when trying to find undergarments?
I think every woman, trans or not, face challenges when trying to find undergarments. But as Trans women, we have very specific needs unique to our experience. The obvious are finding ways to create a bust line and ways to “tuck” comfortably, all while keeping your dignity and sense of self in tact.

Other challenges trans women face when trying to find under garments come from society. If you are a trans woman who is not particularly “passable” and are shopping at a store or public venue, you face the possibility of being harassed, judged, and even physically hurt. People fear things they don’t understand and because of fear act out irrationally.

How does Chrysalis meet those needs?
Chrysalis meets these needs by [addressing those challenges.] Our bras create a natural looking bust line that not only looks natural but feels and moves like natural breasts, using full cup silicone inserts held in hidden pockets. Chrysalis also provides a panty we call our “T-string” that effectively tucks, holds, and smooths out our bikini area for a seamless look. And because our products are available through our online store, our customers can shop safely and comfortably from their home.

Emotionally, Chrysalis provides a sense of dignity and self assurance for our customers with how we market the Chrysalis brand, and our mission behind who we are and what we do. We’re not here to paint a picture of what a trans woman is suppose to look or act like, we’re here to add a different perspective in how we are portrayed and seen by the “outside” community. In the end, there is no one person exactly like the other, and the same can be said for the trans community at large.

What are your inspirations behind the line in terms of design? Is there a specific look you’re going for, beyond functionality?
We are launching this spring with our Basics Collection, which is meant for practical every day use; it’s very streamlined with minimal “bells and whistles.” However, the design and inspiration behind our couture line, which is set to launch via a fashion show in fall 2013, will always be inspired by butterflies! We are inspired by their colors, the way they move, their evolution and transformations, and their individuality. Our couture line will carry corsets, teddys, stockings, tunics, capes, and so on.

What is necessary for a transgender lingerie line to be functional?
As a designer, I’m all about form and function and so is our brand of lingerie. We also acknowledge that there are trans women out there who are “post operative” who’ve had SRS [sex reassignment surgery] and breast augmentation. So of course we will also design and provide lingerie without the need for silicone inserts and “tucking.” We want to attract women who want to feel beautiful in their underwear and lingerie, who are strong willed, intelligent, and unapologetic about their femininity!

What has the response to the line been?
The response has been overwhelmingly positive. From the trans community specifically, it’s been a very emotional response of gratitude, excitement, and support. A lot of our customers feel like their prayers have been answered, quite literally! As a trans woman myself this is very touching.

Do you find that there has been more of a spotlight on the transgender community, especially in fashion, because of models like Lea T and Andrej Pejic?
Indeed! Every little bit helps and counts. What I think makes them very successful is their “relatability.” With other trans activists like Janet Mock, Laverne Cox, Isis King, and Jamie Clayton, being relatable is the key. When I started Chrysalis, that is what I endeavored to do. The only way a person will hear you and listen to you, and hopefully understand you, is to approach it in a way that makes them feel relaxed, calm, and safe. And I hope that is how people from the outside looking in feel about our brand.

What hopes do you have for the line? Any plans for expansion?
Our hopes for the brand is that it is successful, first and foremost, and that we cater to the needs of our customers. Beyond that, a flagship store in NYC is a possibility. We endeavor to be a namesake lifestyle brand for the transgender community at large. If the name Chrysalis is on it, we want our customers to know they can trust it and feel good about it. But who knows what the future may hold, we’re always open to exciting and new opportunities.

As we gain recognition and create a name for ourselves, Chrysalis the brand, would like to give back to our community. A foundation to help our often at risk and homeless youth is at the top of our list.

What do you wish more people understood about transgendered women’s needs in terms of clothing and fashion? That clothing and fashion for transgender people is exactly how it is for non-trans people. It exists because there is a need for it, it has a function, a purpose, and therefore should not be looked at any differently. It shouldn’t be a cause for concern to anyone. Clothing and fashion exists because it is utilitarian and is a conduit for self expression.
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PHOTO EMBROIDERY

Published on Apr 21, 2018
Photo embroidery! Awesome art by #AnaTeresaBarboza.
Embroidered and transfer on fabric. 2010
http://anateresabarboza.blogspot.com
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THERE IS AN OLD TIBETAN SAYING: WHEREVER YOU FEEL AT HOME, YOU ARE AT HOME. IF YOUR SURROUNDINGS ARE PLEASANT, YOU ARE AT HOME.
–TENZIN GYATSO, THE 14TH DALAI LAMA
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LAVERNE COX IS THE WOMAN WE’VE BEEN WAITING FOR.
Published on Dec 28, 2017
Interview by Saeed Jones of Buzzfeed
Minutes before Beyoncé takes the stage at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, three teenage girls spot an actress in the audience. “That’s Laverne Cox!” “Who?” “She’s from Orange Is the New Black!” With their iPhones at the ready for selfies, the trio of fans makes its way toward her to say hello. It’s Dec. 22, 2013, the same week as the launch of Beyoncé’s surprise album and five months since the Netflix series catapulted Cox into a whole new sphere of visibility.
“Oh, so we’re going in!” she chuckled when I asked her about leaving Alabama. It was 8 a.m. in Los Angeles where Cox was filming, but after months of waking up at 5 or 6 a.m. to be on set, an early morning phone interview about her life and career was, apparently, not a problem. “Well, OK! Let’s go in.”

“I mean, 10 years ago, I could go to Lot 61 [the now-defunct Chelsea nightclub]. I wasn’t famous. I wasn’t anybody really. I was just doing me. And they’d let me in because I had my own look and I was doing my own thing. I met a lot of people who kind of introduced me to myself.” Cox points out that nightclubs have traditionally been a space where queer people, trans women in particular, can explore gender with relative safety.

“I never wanted to do a reality television show.” Cox admits. “But, at the same time, for years I wondered what it would be like for a trans person to be on a show like MTV’s The Real World. I just never imagined I’d be that person.” [laughs] The show, a hip-hop take on Donald Trump’s The Apprentice, featured 13 people vying to become P. Diddy’s personal assistant. A short film challenge in Episode 4 features Cox chasing down and tackling an overweight man dressed in a purple hat and cape known as “The Applesauce Bandit.”

Her concern wasn’t unfounded. The first name of Omarosa Manigault, a black woman who competed on The Apprentice in 2004, is still reality TV shorthand for “angry black woman.” And few mediums have seized upon the trope of the entertainingly enraged black woman quite like reality television. Combine that tendency with the way television and film continue to depict trans women as pariahs (or worse), and Cox’s experience on the show is nothing short of a marvel. Though the actress admits, “Being known as the first black trans woman to appear on a reality TV show is a dubious distinction in a lot of ways.”

Her appearance on I Want to Work for Diddy came at a time when Cox says her career was all but nonexistent. “I’d done some off-Broadway theater, independent films, student films, but I hadn’t had a breakthrough. So a lot of it was about advancing my career professionally. And I just thought it was so powerful, you know. Diddy, a black mogul, embracing me, a black trans woman, on national television.” The overwhelmingly positive experience on the show, as well as the emails she received from trans women inspired by seeing one of their sisters on television, convinced Cox to take an even bolder step: producing and starring in a reality television show of her own.
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SOUTH POLE STYLING DESIGN
Published on Dec 10, 2017
Styling and design by Cy Lauz
An international trailblazer in streetwear fashion since 1991, Southpole has been a leader in the apparel industry for over 20 years. Established in the fashion capital of the world, Southpole was the first company to take looks and trends popular on the city streets and translate them into wearable, accessible fashion.
Southpole reaches markets in the United States, Canada, Asia and Europe with its affordable yet stylish denim, sportswear, outerwear, sleepwear and loungewear, footwear and accessories for young mens, juniors, kids, toddlers and infants, and plus size.
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PUGLIA

Published on Nov 22, 2017
The town of #Monopoli is by far my favorite town in the region of #Puglia. #italy
I had a dream the night before that I should "bathe" in these waters to cleanse my spirit... And so I did. #italy#Puglia #BorgoEgnazia #nofilter#adriaticsea
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CHRYSALIS
Published on Feb 21, 2017
"the splitting of the chrysalis and the slow unfolding of the wings"
Under this old skin is a hard skin called a chrysalis.
Once the larvae metamorphose into the pupal stage, rather than remaining fixed to buckwheat plant, the chrysalis drops into the leaf litter at the base.
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EQUESTRIA
Published on Jan 11, 2017
Horses with bling
When I leave this dimension.
I have a thing for #horses with #bling now.🦄
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I always find beauty in things that are odd and imperfect, they are much more interesting.
–MARC JACOBS
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DHD behind the scenes
Published on Jan 03, 2017
Exclusive first look
Another exclusive release from our annual style shoot. Stay tuned for more! #DHDshoot2017!
Everything and More! Another reminder and sneak peak of the #DHDshoot2017 stay tuned for the exclusive release February 8th... you deserve it! 😘 💖
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flēoge

Published on June 05, 2016
Butterflies are often polymorphic, and many species make use of camouflage, mimicry and aposematism to evade their predators. Some, like the monarch and the painted lady, migrate over long distances. Many butterflies are attacked by parasites or parasitoids, including wasps, protozoans, flies, and other invertebrates, or are preyed upon by other organisms.
Butterfly adults are characterized by their four scale-covered wings, which give the Lepidoptera their name (Ancient Greek λεπίς lepís, scale + πτερόν pterón, wing). These scales give butterfly wings their colour: they are pigmented with melanins that give them blacks and browns, as well as uric acid derivatives and flavones that give them yellows, but many of the blues, greens, reds and iridescent colours are created by structural coloration produced by the micro-structures of the scales and hairs.
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FALL STYLING
Published on May 09, 2015
noun
1. the way in which something is made, designed, or performed. "the car's subtle European styling"
When your #italian boyfriend is obsessed with #tuscany.... you design him a Tuscan inspired sitting room. 🤔 #interiordesign #coupling
When you love the #winter season but secretly want it to be #spring already! 😣 #snowday #blizzard
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Anthos

Published on Dec 21, 2014
The essential parts of a flower can be considered in two parts: the vegetative part, consisting of petals and associated structures in the perianth, and the reproductive or sexual parts. A stereotypical flower consists of four kinds of structures attached to the tip of a short stalk. Each of these kinds of parts is arranged in a whorl on the receptacle. The four main whorls (starting from the base of the flower or lowest node and working upwards) are as follows:
Although the arrangement described above is considered "typical", plant species show a wide variation in floral structure. These modifications have significance in the evolution of flowering plants and are used extensively by botanists to establish relationships among plant species.

Flowers may be directly attached to the plant at their base (sessile—the supporting stalk or stem is highly reduced or absent). The stem or stalk subtending a flower is called a peduncle. If a peduncle supports more than one flower, the stems connecting each flower to the main axis are called pedicels. The apex of a flowering stem forms a terminal swelling which is called the torus or receptacle.
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I loathe narcissism, but I approve of vanity.
–Diana Vreeland
Anthos

Published on Mar 27, 2014
Yes please! 😮😍🤗 Gold, titanium, aquamarine and diamond earrings by @mark.baldin #russianjewelry #earrings #jewelry movocam👍👍👍🔝!!
I found the chandelier I wanted! AND it was at a fraction of the price I was originally quoted. 😍😀🤗 #interiordesign #lighting #chandelier #sia
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